Proclamation and Praise: Hebrews 2:12 and the Christology of Worship by Ron Man

Proclamation and Praise: Hebrews 2:12 and the Christology of Worship
ISBN 1556350562
  • Author:
    Ron Man
  • Title:
    Proclamation and Praise: Hebrews 2:12 and the Christology of Worship
  • Category:
  • Subcategory:
    Worship & Devotion
  • ISBN13:
    978-1556350566
  • Publisher:
    Wipf & Stock Pub (September 1, 2007)
  • Pages:
    118
  • Size PDF version
    1434 kb
  • Size FB2 version
    1372 kb
  • Size EPUB version
    1451 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    513
  • Other Formats:
    lrf mbr lrf azw
An important missing element in today's raging worship debates is a proper acknowledgment of the continuing ministry of the living Christ in mediating and leading our worship. This is a crucial truth that transcends issues of style and form and thus provides a foundation for a unified and unifying understanding of worship, in spite of the wide diversity of worship expressions that has always characterized the body of Christ. The wonderful fact is that we are not left to worship God on our own strength! Rather, the grace of God, which is so abundantly provided to us for our salvation and sanctification, can be seen to be just as operational and effectual when it comes to our worship. Our worship is acceptable and pleasing to God not because of any inherent excellence of its own, but because we come in Christ and his righteousness into the Father's presence. In Hebrews 2:12 we find an amazingly succinct yet powerful description of the two-way mediating ministry of Christ: he continues to be the agent of God's revelation to us and also serves as the leader and facilitator of our response back to God in worship. Christ does not just open or show us the way into the Father's presence in worship; he actively leads us, takes us with him so that we might enjoy the same relationship of love and fellowship that he himself enjoys with the Father. This transforming understanding opens up a wide range of complementary truths concerning the Trinitarian and Christological implications of worship--with profound implications for our churches.


Humin
This book was required reading when I began a doctorate in seminary and in fact Dr Man taught a portion of the course. Having been a musician and worship leader for many years n the church I felt I understood the pattern of worship. After reading this book I discovered there are biblical patterns for praise and worship within the church some of which I had never Incorporated into action. I consider this one of the best theological descriptions of foundational worship. The book is short but deep. One must read and focus on the concepts in order for it to be fully understood. Every praise and worship leader should have this book!
Prorahun
We have all heard various definitions of worship. This to me, however, puts forth the definitive meaning. Too often, we see ourselves as initiators when, in truth, God is and will always be the initiator in our relationship. We "do" because He has "done." I am able to worship because Christ first offered worship. I sing the song He wrote for me. I am the responder to His proclamation of praise.
Kikora
Good book
interactive man
I love reading books on Scripture and was excited to dig into what I thought was going to be a good book as I opened up Proclamation and Praise. But that is not the case. While there were aspects of this book that I liked, the overwhelming use of other authors turned me off to this book. It is difficult to follow Man's train of thought, and by the time you get to ch. 5 you aren't sure if he is writing the book or if he is just compiling what others have said.
Runehammer
The author is thoroughly Bible-focused, which is the greatest attribute of the book--other than its shortness. He claims to develop a "Christology of Worship," but the Christology promised in the title was never developed.. I believe he has touched on a need within the theological community, but much more needs to be written to call if a Christology.

A complete Christology must address additional issues. He should have included a much broader survey of when and how does the Bible describes Christ’s worship (in his preincarnate state, his incarnation, his ascension). He should have addressed many more questions on the subject. How does our worship relate to Jesus? (I.e., do we worship God alone or Christ alone or both? How does this inform our potential worship of the Holy Spirit?) What does the name above every name in Philippians 2 mean, and how does it affect our view of the Father? What forms should our Christ worship take? How do the Old Testament forms of worship relate to Jesus Christ? The author needs to revisit this grossly incomplete work before it should be deemed worthy of academic attention. (Frankly, it feels like a 500-level seminary research paper that he decided to have published.)

The book was so narrowly focused as to make itself practically and theologically useless. Man’s work was basically an exegesis of one half of one verse (Hebrews 2:12 plus some biblical context of the same), expounding the role of Christ as worship leader for the church. It failed to support its own title. It failed to make practical application for the church today. And it failed to address the abundance of biblical data on its own topic.

It may prove helpful to some who have little familiarity with the book of Hebrews or with the subject of Christ as the fulfillment of the Old Testament roles of Prophet, Priest, and King. Yet, it only just scratches the surfaces of these subjects, with a little more information on the prophet/apostle role of Christ than the others. I don't recommend it to anyone, however, if the author were to release a second, expanded edition that was a thorough treatment of his subject, I believe it might be worth attention. At its best, this book starts a conversation that many should join: what is a biblical Christology of Worship? I trust those of you who are still reading this review all the way to this point are the ones to carry that conversation forward by publishing more complete treatments of the topic.
Fhois
This book is a deep bore of Hebrews 2:12, a very significant passage that "encapsulates two continuing and complementary post-ascension activities of Christ”. After a careful exegesis of the passage that draws on the work of many important biblical scholars, the author presents 12 powerful implications for worship. An incredible chapter! The result is a rich Christology of worship that shows how all true worship is in and through and by Jesus Christ. I find myself coming back to this book again and again to mine the riches it contains. I agree with the author when he says that this passage, and the Old Testament quotation Ps 22:22, have far-reaching implications for how we understand the Church, her Head and her worship. Time spent with this book will enrich a personal and corporate understanding of worship as well as lead to a rich biblically sound practice of worship. Highly recommended if you want to gain a good understanding of Hebrews 2:12 - something every worship leader, pastor and worshipper should possess.
Benn
This book was required reading when I began a doctorate in seminary and in fact Dr Man taught a portion of the course. Having been a musician and worship leader for many years n the church I felt I understood the pattern of worship. After reading this book I discovered there are biblical patterns for praise and worship within the church some of which I had never Incorporated into action. I consider this one of the best theological descriptions of foundational worship. The book is short but deep. One must read and focus on the concepts in order for it to be fully understood. Every praise and worship leader should have this book!
We have all heard various definitions of worship. This to me, however, puts forth the definitive meaning. Too often, we see ourselves as initiators when, in truth, God is and will always be the initiator in our relationship. We "do" because He has "done." I am able to worship because Christ first offered worship. I sing the song He wrote for me. I am the responder to His proclamation of praise.
Good book
I love reading books on Scripture and was excited to dig into what I thought was going to be a good book as I opened up Proclamation and Praise. But that is not the case. While there were aspects of this book that I liked, the overwhelming use of other authors turned me off to this book. It is difficult to follow Man's train of thought, and by the time you get to ch. 5 you aren't sure if he is writing the book or if he is just compiling what others have said.
The author is thoroughly Bible-focused, which is the greatest attribute of the book--other than its shortness. He claims to develop a "Christology of Worship," but the Christology promised in the title was never developed.. I believe he has touched on a need within the theological community, but much more needs to be written to call if a Christology.

A complete Christology must address additional issues. He should have included a much broader survey of when and how does the Bible describes Christ’s worship (in his preincarnate state, his incarnation, his ascension). He should have addressed many more questions on the subject. How does our worship relate to Jesus? (I.e., do we worship God alone or Christ alone or both? How does this inform our potential worship of the Holy Spirit?) What does the name above every name in Philippians 2 mean, and how does it affect our view of the Father? What forms should our Christ worship take? How do the Old Testament forms of worship relate to Jesus Christ? The author needs to revisit this grossly incomplete work before it should be deemed worthy of academic attention. (Frankly, it feels like a 500-level seminary research paper that he decided to have published.)

The book was so narrowly focused as to make itself practically and theologically useless. Man’s work was basically an exegesis of one half of one verse (Hebrews 2:12 plus some biblical context of the same), expounding the role of Christ as worship leader for the church. It failed to support its own title. It failed to make practical application for the church today. And it failed to address the abundance of biblical data on its own topic.

It may prove helpful to some who have little familiarity with the book of Hebrews or with the subject of Christ as the fulfillment of the Old Testament roles of Prophet, Priest, and King. Yet, it only just scratches the surfaces of these subjects, with a little more information on the prophet/apostle role of Christ than the others. I don't recommend it to anyone, however, if the author were to release a second, expanded edition that was a thorough treatment of his subject, I believe it might be worth attention. At its best, this book starts a conversation that many should join: what is a biblical Christology of Worship? I trust those of you who are still reading this review all the way to this point are the ones to carry that conversation forward by publishing more complete treatments of the topic.
This book is a deep bore of Hebrews 2:12, a very significant passage that "encapsulates two continuing and complementary post-ascension activities of Christ”. After a careful exegesis of the passage that draws on the work of many important biblical scholars, the author presents 12 powerful implications for worship. An incredible chapter! The result is a rich Christology of worship that shows how all true worship is in and through and by Jesus Christ. I find myself coming back to this book again and again to mine the riches it contains. I agree with the author when he says that this passage, and the Old Testament quotation Ps 22:22, have far-reaching implications for how we understand the Church, her Head and her worship. Time spent with this book will enrich a personal and corporate understanding of worship as well as lead to a rich biblically sound practice of worship. Highly recommended if you want to gain a good understanding of Hebrews 2:12 - something every worship leader, pastor and worshipper should possess.